All time Favorite Pro Wrestler

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Pick: One good guy, one bad guy.

Mine:

Hacksaw Jim Duggan

Sgt. Slaughter


Go!
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This is a hard question.

Sting
Shawn Michaels
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I can't split it up so crudely, but I could talk about 90s pro wrestling for hours.

Shawn Michaels is, in my opinion, the greatest professional wrestler to ever breathe. He was a jackass in his heyday whose participation in the Montreal Screwjob will forever link him to the worst betrayal in the business, but as an entertainer, a storyteller (both in the ring and with the mic), a performer, a showman? There's nobody else that has ever come close. The latter half of his ring career was a great redemption arc, famously punking Hogan, burying the hatchet with Bret (and owning up to his previous failures), proving he was still the best to do it despite a crippling back injury, and arguably having his best matches as an older star. His Wrestlemania matches with the Undertaker alone would've been an incredible capstone.

I haven't really been too involved in WWE for the last 10 years or so beyond surface level check ins, so his leadership of NXT is not at all on my radar. Hopefully it's going very well and he and Haitch are going to keep WWE churning while this UFC merger looms over all their decision making.

Other greats of which I am biased toward:
  • Bret "The Hitman" Hart: The Excellence of Execution and his family were vital in the post-steroids-trial recovery era of the then-WWF. He demonstrated that not only could a smaller guy put on better matches than the big guys, but could make the company money in the process. Hart's dedication to the business was legendary, and while his hypocrisy as a person and professional left a lot to be desired (at least after reading his stellar autobiography), there's no argument that he's one of the greatest ever.
  • The Undertaker: The quintessential professional wrestler who most casual fans know and depending on when you grew up, there was a version of the Dead Man for everybody. I grew up with OG 'Taker who was genuinely unsettling at the time, at least by the standards of the TV era. Paul Bearer was a terrific asset, and his prime days of the 90s were a splendid time to be a young fan. His ability to evolve and morph, shift and adapt, gimmick-to-gimmick is legendary. No matter what he did he made money; no matter how his music and outfit changed he put on banger matches. Nobody will ever have a career like his again, as current and future pro wrestling and television will never be comparable to the ever-shifting era of the 1990s-2000s.
  • Triple H: He's probably the greatest heel wrestler of all time. I don't have any particular fondness toward one portion of his career over another, but whether he was long-haired and douchey or bearded, bald, and corporate, Haitch knew how to get the audience to despise him, regardless of era. He had some babyface moments, particularly in DX, but his heel work is on another level. The only heel that you could compare him to was Hollywood Hogan, and even that had a shelf life and never really adapted to the times besides the famous 3rd man plot. Triple H's legacy will be on a higher plane once he's done with the management/creative aspect of WWE today. His contributions to the developmental part of the business are vital, since the territory days are dead and gone. NXT has proven to be a compelling product that's invaluable to the flagship, and there was no way Vince would ever have signed off on it if it was anybody else's idea.
  • "Stone Cold" Steve Austin: I forgot to put Austin on the damn list. Arguably the most popular wrestler to ever live, the most successful gimmick ever made, and the most profitable career of any wrestler in history. The "what?" bullshit and latter days of his career were less than compelling, but the audience pops for the glass shatter are simply gobs above any crowd response. He changed the wrestling industry forever when he won King of the Ring in 1998, and when his health wasn't failing him or his professionalism flagging (or anything involving Debra marring his reputation), Austin is a bonafide cornerstone of professional wrestling that could tell a story with the best of them.
I'm omitting The Rock and Mick Foley, as the Rock is simply beyond a wrestler and his WWF/E days now seem incredibly awkward to look back on. His WM match with Hogan in Toronto is one for the ages.

Mick Foley I didn't really enjoy so much as a wrestler, but his story is one of the best in professional sports. Read his book, watch the documentaries, etc. He's one of a kind.

There's a lot I'm forgetting, I'm sure, but I grew up watching from 1993-2003 or so, then got back into it from 2014-2017. I never really watched much WCW, but I thought they had some really cool ideas. Older fans than myself will likely swear that the industry was never better than the 1980s, and they'd have a case. Hogan, Warrior, Savage, Piper, Steamboat, Flair, Andre, etc. The pro wrestling business made a mountain in those days, and it demands respect. There's an enormous sect of the modern fandom that probably think Brock Lesnar, John Cena, Randy Orton, Daniel Bryan, and Batista are the greatest to ever do it, and I don't blame them for feeling that way.

Anyways, I like wrestling. If you haven't read Mick Foley or Bret Hart's autobiographies, you're doing yourself a disservice. Fascinating stuff.
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Big Daddy
Giant Haystacks

Edit: and Kendo Nagasaki
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UOK wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 8:32 am I can't split it up so crudely, but I could talk about 90s pro wrestling for hours.

Shawn Michaels is, in my opinion, the greatest professional wrestler to ever breathe. He was a jackass in his heyday whose participation in the Montreal Screwjob will forever link him to the worst betrayal in the business, but as an entertainer, a storyteller (both in the ring and with the mic), a performer, a showman? There's nobody else that has ever come close. The latter half of his ring career was a great redemption arc, famously punking Hogan, burying the hatchet with Bret (and owning up to his previous failures), proving he was still the best to do it despite a crippling back injury, and arguably having his best matches as an older star. His Wrestlemania matches with the Undertaker alone would've been an incredible capstone.

I haven't really been too involved in WWE for the last 10 years or so beyond surface level check ins, so his leadership of NXT is not at all on my radar. Hopefully it's going very well and he and Haitch are going to keep WWE churning while this UFC merger looms over all their decision making.

Other greats of which I am biased toward:
  • Bret "The Hitman" Hart: The Excellence of Execution and his family were vital in the post-steroids-trial recovery era of the then-WWF. He demonstrated that not only could a smaller guy put on better matches than the big guys, but could make the company money in the process. Hart's dedication to the business was legendary, and while his hypocrisy as a person and professional left a lot to be desired (at least after reading his stellar autobiography), there's no argument that he's one of the greatest ever.
  • The Undertaker: The quintessential professional wrestler who most casual fans know and depending on when you grew up, there was a version of the Dead Man for everybody. I grew up with OG 'Taker who was genuinely unsettling at the time, at least by the standards of the TV era. Paul Bearer was a terrific asset, and his prime days of the 90s were a splendid time to be a young fan. His ability to evolve and morph, shift and adapt, gimmick-to-gimmick is legendary. No matter what he did he made money; no matter how his music and outfit changed he put on banger matches. Nobody will ever have a career like his again, as current and future pro wrestling and television will never be comparable to the ever-shifting era of the 1990s-2000s.
  • Triple H: He's probably the greatest heel wrestler of all time. I don't have any particular fondness toward one portion of his career over another, but whether he was long-haired and douchey or bearded, bald, and corporate, Haitch knew how to get the audience to despise him, regardless of era. He had some babyface moments, particularly in DX, but his heel work is on another level. The only heel that you could compare him to was Hollywood Hogan, and even that had a shelf life and never really adapted to the times besides the famous 3rd man plot. Triple H's legacy will be on a higher plane once he's done with the management/creative aspect of WWE today. His contributions to the developmental part of the business are vital, since the territory days are dead and gone. NXT has proven to be a compelling product that's invaluable to the flagship, and there was no way Vince would ever have signed off on it if it was anybody else's idea.
  • "Stone Cold" Steve Austin: I forgot to put Austin on the damn list. Arguably the most popular wrestler to ever live, the most successful gimmick ever made, and the most profitable career of any wrestler in history. The "what?" bullshit and latter days of his career were less than compelling, but the audience pops for the glass shatter are simply gobs above any crowd response. He changed the wrestling industry forever when he won King of the Ring in 1998, and when his health wasn't failing him or his professionalism flagging (or anything involving Debra marring his reputation), Austin is a bonafide cornerstone of professional wrestling that could tell a story with the best of them.
I'm omitting The Rock and Mick Foley, as the Rock is simply beyond a wrestler and his WWF/E days now seem incredibly awkward to look back on. His WM match with Hogan in Toronto is one for the ages.

Mick Foley I didn't really enjoy so much as a wrestler, but his story is one of the best in professional sports. Read his book, watch the documentaries, etc. He's one of a kind.

There's a lot I'm forgetting, I'm sure, but I grew up watching from 1993-2003 or so, then got back into it from 2014-2017. I never really watched much WCW, but I thought they had some really cool ideas. Older fans than myself will likely swear that the industry was never better than the 1980s, and they'd have a case. Hogan, Warrior, Savage, Piper, Steamboat, Flair, Andre, etc. The pro wrestling business made a mountain in those days, and it demands respect. There's an enormous sect of the modern fandom that probably think Brock Lesnar, John Cena, Randy Orton, Daniel Bryan, and Batista are the greatest to ever do it, and I don't blame them for feeling that way.

Anyways, I like wrestling. If you haven't read Mick Foley or Bret Hart's autobiographies, you're doing yourself a disservice. Fascinating stuff.
Late 90's/Early 00's wrestling was - simply put - some of the greatest entertainment on television. The monday night wars were beyond compelling, the storylines were engaging. It was such an amazing time.

I grew up on Hogan, Ultimate Warrior, Macho Man, Jake the Snake, Andre the Giant etc... but the Raw and Attitude eras were by far the most entertaining.

HHH, Stone Cold, Edge, Goldberg, Jericho, Undertaker, Kane, DX, NWO, DDP, Bret Hart, Scott Hall, Big Show, The Hardy Boys, Kevin Nash... I could go on forever.
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wab wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 9:36 am
UOK wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 8:32 am I can't split it up so crudely, but I could talk about 90s pro wrestling for hours.

Shawn Michaels is, in my opinion, the greatest professional wrestler to ever breathe. He was a jackass in his heyday whose participation in the Montreal Screwjob will forever link him to the worst betrayal in the business, but as an entertainer, a storyteller (both in the ring and with the mic), a performer, a showman? There's nobody else that has ever come close. The latter half of his ring career was a great redemption arc, famously punking Hogan, burying the hatchet with Bret (and owning up to his previous failures), proving he was still the best to do it despite a crippling back injury, and arguably having his best matches as an older star. His Wrestlemania matches with the Undertaker alone would've been an incredible capstone.

I haven't really been too involved in WWE for the last 10 years or so beyond surface level check ins, so his leadership of NXT is not at all on my radar. Hopefully it's going very well and he and Haitch are going to keep WWE churning while this UFC merger looms over all their decision making.

Other greats of which I am biased toward:
  • Bret "The Hitman" Hart: The Excellence of Execution and his family were vital in the post-steroids-trial recovery era of the then-WWF. He demonstrated that not only could a smaller guy put on better matches than the big guys, but could make the company money in the process. Hart's dedication to the business was legendary, and while his hypocrisy as a person and professional left a lot to be desired (at least after reading his stellar autobiography), there's no argument that he's one of the greatest ever.
  • The Undertaker: The quintessential professional wrestler who most casual fans know and depending on when you grew up, there was a version of the Dead Man for everybody. I grew up with OG 'Taker who was genuinely unsettling at the time, at least by the standards of the TV era. Paul Bearer was a terrific asset, and his prime days of the 90s were a splendid time to be a young fan. His ability to evolve and morph, shift and adapt, gimmick-to-gimmick is legendary. No matter what he did he made money; no matter how his music and outfit changed he put on banger matches. Nobody will ever have a career like his again, as current and future pro wrestling and television will never be comparable to the ever-shifting era of the 1990s-2000s.
  • Triple H: He's probably the greatest heel wrestler of all time. I don't have any particular fondness toward one portion of his career over another, but whether he was long-haired and douchey or bearded, bald, and corporate, Haitch knew how to get the audience to despise him, regardless of era. He had some babyface moments, particularly in DX, but his heel work is on another level. The only heel that you could compare him to was Hollywood Hogan, and even that had a shelf life and never really adapted to the times besides the famous 3rd man plot. Triple H's legacy will be on a higher plane once he's done with the management/creative aspect of WWE today. His contributions to the developmental part of the business are vital, since the territory days are dead and gone. NXT has proven to be a compelling product that's invaluable to the flagship, and there was no way Vince would ever have signed off on it if it was anybody else's idea.
  • "Stone Cold" Steve Austin: I forgot to put Austin on the damn list. Arguably the most popular wrestler to ever live, the most successful gimmick ever made, and the most profitable career of any wrestler in history. The "what?" bullshit and latter days of his career were less than compelling, but the audience pops for the glass shatter are simply gobs above any crowd response. He changed the wrestling industry forever when he won King of the Ring in 1998, and when his health wasn't failing him or his professionalism flagging (or anything involving Debra marring his reputation), Austin is a bonafide cornerstone of professional wrestling that could tell a story with the best of them.
I'm omitting The Rock and Mick Foley, as the Rock is simply beyond a wrestler and his WWF/E days now seem incredibly awkward to look back on. His WM match with Hogan in Toronto is one for the ages.

Mick Foley I didn't really enjoy so much as a wrestler, but his story is one of the best in professional sports. Read his book, watch the documentaries, etc. He's one of a kind.

There's a lot I'm forgetting, I'm sure, but I grew up watching from 1993-2003 or so, then got back into it from 2014-2017. I never really watched much WCW, but I thought they had some really cool ideas. Older fans than myself will likely swear that the industry was never better than the 1980s, and they'd have a case. Hogan, Warrior, Savage, Piper, Steamboat, Flair, Andre, etc. The pro wrestling business made a mountain in those days, and it demands respect. There's an enormous sect of the modern fandom that probably think Brock Lesnar, John Cena, Randy Orton, Daniel Bryan, and Batista are the greatest to ever do it, and I don't blame them for feeling that way.

Anyways, I like wrestling. If you haven't read Mick Foley or Bret Hart's autobiographies, you're doing yourself a disservice. Fascinating stuff.
Late 90's/Early 00's wrestling was - simply put - some of the greatest entertainment on television. The monday night wars were beyond compelling, the storylines were engaging. It was such an amazing time.

I grew up on Hogan, Ultimate Warrior, Macho Man, Jake the Snake, Andre the Giant etc... but the Raw and Attitude eras were by far the most entertaining.

HHH, Stone Cold, Edge, Goldberg, Jericho, Undertaker, Kane, DX, NWO, DDP, Bret Hart, Scott Hall, Big Show, The Hardy Boys, Kevin Nash... I could go on forever.
It was the trashiest, most spectacular garbage TV, lol. It was a "you had to live it to get it" era, and looking back you could never possibly air most of their schlock these days and have it succeed. It was perfect time, perfect place.
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Way too much older. Mine were Dick the Bruiser and Junk Yard Dog.
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As far as personality, I always thought Hacksaw Duggan was one of the most entertaining. His in-ring skills were kinda meh, but worked his personality into his movements and bumps.
Ricky The Dragon Steamboat was boring to listen to, but could light up the ring and did things many guys didn't think about before there were American circuit wrestlers doing those things. I think he has more all time great matches than anyone else. (Rick Flair, Macho Man Savage, Don the Rock Muraco, Jake the Snake Roberts, then after being retired for 10 years came back and faced Jericho and looked great despite being there to put Chris over.)
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Oh man....mine are definitely from the 80's when I was little and thought it was all real lol.....

I'm going to go with Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka. That said, I had several other favorites that I feel compelled to mention:

Ivan Putski "The Polish Hammer"
Iron Sheik (just a great heel)
Andre the Giant
The Hart Foundation (RIP Anvil)
Randy "Macho Man" Savage
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dplank wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 12:20 pm Oh man....mine are definitely from the 80's when I was little and thought it was all real lol.....
Wait, what, it wasn't all real????
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dplank wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 12:20 pm The Hart Foundation (RIP Anvil)
And Owen Hart along with the "British Bulldog" Davey Boy Smith are also passed. Owen infamously perished in a botched stunt from the roof of an arena, and Bulldog died of an enlarged heart.

The Hart family certainly has had no shortage of grief.
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Damn I didn’t know that
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haven't watched much wrestling in a while, but I do have fond memories of the old days of the 4 Horsemen and the Road Warriors ... Ric Flair in his prime was a hoot with his promos ... Macho Man Randy Savage was also great in his promos

then if you want to go way back, Dick the Bruiser was a Chicago area/Midwest legend
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When I was a kid (late 80's/early 90's) I was a sucker for any wrestler with a prop. Hacksaw was great. Jake the Snake. And my favorite growing up was the Big Boss Man. And this is purely because 10 year old Rusty thought nightsticks were just the coolest weapon.

There was a period where the Big Boss Man's chief rival was the Mountie, who had a cattle prod (??????) and that was tough for me... because little Rusty also thought cattle prods were pretty sweet.
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Rusty Trombagent wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2023 12:38 pm When I was a kid (late 80's/early 90's) I was a sucker for any wrestler with a prop. Hacksaw was great. Jake the Snake. And my favorite growing up was the Big Boss Man. And this is purely because 10 year old Rusty thought nightsticks were just the coolest weapon.

There was a period where the Big Boss Man's chief rival was the Mountie, who had a cattle prod (??????) and that was tough for me... because little Rusty also thought cattle prods were pretty sweet.
Maybe this is why I was so fond of The British Bulldogs (and Davey Boy Smith in particular) as a kid.
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Good guy - The Crusher, the man who made Milwaukee famous

[video][/video]


Bad guy - Ric Flair and the 4 Horsemen. Had to love the Vachon Brothers as well.
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Grizzled wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 1:36 pm
dplank wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 12:20 pm Oh man....mine are definitely from the 80's when I was little and thought it was all real lol.....
Wait, what, it wasn't all real????
As a child I was convinced it was all real until I watched Wrestlemania VI and the Ultimate Warrior beat Hulk Hogan.

I was like no way that’s total bullshit. No way Hogan loses. I figured that match was fixed.
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Good Guy:

Hulk Hogan. One of my key childhood heroes. There’s no replacing The Hulkster. Bonus points for being in Rocky 3 as Thunderlips The Ultimate Object Of Desire.

Honorable Mentions to: Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, The Dudley Boyz, the biker version of the Undertaker, and Cactus Jack.

Heel

Triple H. He so was good at being a heel that I fucking hated him and loved him at the same time. I hated that he was with the boss’s daughter and he constantly won the championship. It was awful. At the same time the whole aura he had plus the Motörhead music was great.

That whole Attitude Era was a Golden Age that I just don’t think we will ever see again. I haven’t watched wrestling with regularity in years.


Separately, Kurt Angle entertained me to no end.

Joe Rogan has interviews with wrestlers, not in character but as real people on JRE. All of them have been great. To my knowledge he’s had on Undertaker, Ric Flair, Hulk Hogan and Kurt Angle.
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UOK wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 10:19 am
wab wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 9:36 am

Late 90's/Early 00's wrestling was - simply put - some of the greatest entertainment on television. The monday night wars were beyond compelling, the storylines were engaging. It was such an amazing time.

I grew up on Hogan, Ultimate Warrior, Macho Man, Jake the Snake, Andre the Giant etc... but the Raw and Attitude eras were by far the most entertaining.

HHH, Stone Cold, Edge, Goldberg, Jericho, Undertaker, Kane, DX, NWO, DDP, Bret Hart, Scott Hall, Big Show, The Hardy Boys, Kevin Nash... I could go on forever.
It was the trashiest, most spectacular garbage TV, lol. It was a "you had to live it to get it" era, and looking back you could never possibly air most of their schlock these days and have it succeed. It was perfect time, perfect place.
Looking forward to Raw was so surreal. What a time. On the weekends, I’d be watching college football on Saturdays, then the Bears on Sundays and a conversation about what’s going to happen on Raw was a guarantee to happen at least once with my friends.

The marathon Sundays. Noon football. 3pm football and then the 7pm-ish WWF PPV. Each time theorizing what would happen on that PPV would dominate the conversations that day.

You truly did have to live through it to “get it”. Like how would you explain The Rock & Sock Connection to somebody today?
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wab wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2023 2:07 pm
Rusty Trombagent wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2023 12:38 pm When I was a kid (late 80's/early 90's) I was a sucker for any wrestler with a prop. Hacksaw was great. Jake the Snake. And my favorite growing up was the Big Boss Man. And this is purely because 10 year old Rusty thought nightsticks were just the coolest weapon.

There was a period where the Big Boss Man's chief rival was the Mountie, who had a cattle prod (??????) and that was tough for me... because little Rusty also thought cattle prods were pretty sweet.
Maybe this is why I was so fond of The British Bulldogs (and Davey Boy Smith in particular) as a kid.
Even as a little kid I was put off by his cornrows. Is he a British dude that just vacationed in the Carribean? Is this a subtle nod to British colonialism? So strange. If he had incorporated his bulldog into his finishing move I might feel differently.

Bonus shout out to the Honky Tonk Man, who sometimes hit people with his guitar.
Last edited by Rusty Trombagent on Fri Oct 27, 2023 7:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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wab wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2023 2:07 pm
Rusty Trombagent wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2023 12:38 pm When I was a kid (late 80's/early 90's) I was a sucker for any wrestler with a prop. Hacksaw was great. Jake the Snake. And my favorite growing up was the Big Boss Man. And this is purely because 10 year old Rusty thought nightsticks were just the coolest weapon.

There was a period where the Big Boss Man's chief rival was the Mountie, who had a cattle prod (??????) and that was tough for me... because little Rusty also thought cattle prods were pretty sweet.
Maybe this is why I was so fond of The British Bulldogs (and Davey Boy Smith in particular) as a kid.
So many good tag teams in the 80s only to be arguably topped by the 90s / 00s.

Demolition
The Hart Foundation
The British Bulldogs
Strike Force
The Rockers
The Mega Powers. More of a gimmick.

Then in the 90s / 00s:

The Dudley Boyz. In my mind the Kings Of Tag Team
Hardy Boyz
Edge & Christian
The Rock & Sock Connection. Another gimmick but OMG what a gimmick!
DX. Holy shit! D FUCKING X!
New Age Outlaws

I’m leaving off so many but I could never name them all. All of them glorious.
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Rusty Trombagent wrote: Fri Oct 27, 2023 7:29 am
wab wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2023 2:07 pm

Maybe this is why I was so fond of The British Bulldogs (and Davey Boy Smith in particular) as a kid.
Even as a little kid I was put off by his cornrows. Is he a British dude that just vacationed in the Carribean? Is this a subtle nod to British colonialism? So strange. If he had incorporated his bulldog into his finishing move I might feel differently.

Bonus shout out to the Honky Tonk Man, who sometimes hit people with his guitar.
Didn’t he always bring Matilda in to lick the face of his beaten opponent? Or am I misremembering that. I wanted a damn bulldog so bad as a kid it was almost manic.
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The Marshall Plan wrote: Fri Oct 27, 2023 7:09 am
Grizzled wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2023 1:36 pm

Wait, what, it wasn't all real????
As a child I was convinced it was all real until I watched Wrestlemania VI and the Ultimate Warrior beat Hulk Hogan.

I was like no way that’s total bullshit. No way Hogan loses. I figured that match was fixed.
I grew up before the days of wrestlemania. When I was in the 6th grade, though, the Midwest wrestling circuit had a show at the local high school, Niles East (gone but not forgotten). We had a blast. There was a guy, the Iron Baron, tall like 6'6", wore one of those German WWI helmets and an Iron Cross, a bunch of other guys. Was about that time I realized it might not be real but a really fun time.
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The Marshall Plan
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Another thing about wrestling.

As a kid, my parents wouldn’t let me get the PPVs. I’d get the results via word of mouth, the wrestling shows on the following weekend and then wrestling magazines.

This is where Blockbuster Video came into play. My buddies and I would rent those PPVs, setup a sleepover, order a pizza and knock those out.
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alexwilkins
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CM Punk. Best in the world!
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Xee
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I know next to nothing about wrestling as I never was a fan but I read this whole thread because it made me think of my grandpa. When I was a kid, my brothers and I would sometimes spend a week here and there in the summer at my grandparents house, and he loved wrestling. He barely knew how to speak or read English but he knew enough that when I would pick up the tv guide to see what there was to watch, I would see that he had circled all the times wrestling would be on for the week in rough, squiggly lines, so he wouldn't miss any of it. And if I ever was in the living room when he was watching it, I always remembered him laughing through a match at what was going on, having a blast. I hadn't thought about this in a while so thanks for bringing back the memories!
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Hulk's told this story like a million times, but I love it so much:


I like to start off morning meetings at work with this story every now and again. "OK, thanks everyone for coming, hope everyone had a good weekend. Now, the year is 1987, and a lot of you are too young to remember the Pontiac Silver dome..."
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alexwilkins wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2023 2:46 pm CM Punk. Best in the world!
I used to really enjoy CM Punk, and to some extent I still do, but it's become very, very clear over the last 10 years that he is an immense pain in the ass to work with, and has an ego that isn't worth tolerating as a coworker no matter how much money and eyes he brings in.
Rusty Trombagent wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2023 11:50 am Hulk's told this story like a million times, but I love it so much:


I like to start off morning meetings at work with this story every now and again. "OK, thanks everyone for coming, hope everyone had a good weekend. Now, the year is 1987, and a lot of you are too young to remember the Pontiac Silver dome..."
Hulk Hogan and Steve Austin have a very unique thing in common - they both have destroyed their hips and backs due to their finishing moves. Especially in Hogan's case, his big legdrop, as simple and seemingly painless as it seems to deliver, done thousands of times by a man his size over decades? Guy has had countless surgeries thanks to that stupid leg drop. It's one of the biggest regrets of his career. Same with Austin falling on his butt delivering stunner after stunner. It takes a toll.
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Oh wow, i didnt know that about the leg drop. At first blush that sounded like more hulk hogan personal mythology bullshit but it sounds like it's actually true.
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UOK wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2023 8:06 am
alexwilkins wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2023 2:46 pm CM Punk. Best in the world!
I used to really enjoy CM Punk, and to some extent I still do, but it's become very, very clear over the last 10 years that he is an immense pain in the ass to work with, and has an ego that isn't worth tolerating as a coworker no matter how much money and eyes he brings in.
Didn't that dude try to fight for real in the UFC and get the shit beat out of him?

Speaking of which, Brock Lesner was a genuine bad ass. That dude was a top level UFC fighter when he got into that and tried to do it.
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